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<  Adult Breakout Group  ~  October 22/24 2010 - Jesus teaches us to pray

PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2010 9:43 am
Posts: 92Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2004 8:29 pm
Preparation: read Matthew Chapter 6 http://www.usccb.org/nab/bible/matthew/matthew6.htm and Luke chapters 10 http://www.usccb.org/nab/bible/luke/luke10.htm and 11http://www.usccb.org/nab/bible/luke/luke11.htm. Read in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Part 4, Section 2, article 1: http://www.usccb.org/catechism/text/pt4sect2.shtml

For the breakout session before the break, we will do a modified lectio divina, using the major sections of Matthew's version of the Our Father as the text. So for each of the following texts:
1) Our Father, Who art in heaven, Hallowed be Thy Name.
2) Thy Kingdom come. Thy Will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven.
3 )Give us this day our daily bread.
4) And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.
5) And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.
A) someone will read the text slowly. Then, in silence, we listen to the text for the word or words that stand out for us. After a short time, people are encouraged to share the word or phrase. There is no interpretation or discussion; only the word or phrase that stood out for that person is shared.
B)Someone will read the text again. This time, in silence, we listen for where/how this text touches our life this day. Again, people are invited to share a short statement of what he or she has seen or heard
C) Some will read the text a third time. This time, we are asked to listen for what this text is calling us or challenging us to be or do or become this day. Again, people are invited to share.

Because of time constraints each part of this will be short but hopefully after the 45 minutes or so, we will have a sense of how to practice lectio divina and have a deepened sense of praying the Lord's prayer.

After the break, we will look at some overall aspects of the Lord's prayer, roughly using the ideas in the introduction to Part 4 Section 2 of the CCC.
http://www.usccb.org/catechism/text/pt4sect2.shtml#art1
We will start by briefly looking at Luke's version of the Lord's Prayer. (Luke 11:1-4)
Quote:
He was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, "Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples."
He said to them, "When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread and forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive everyone in debt to us, and do not subject us to the final test."


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:44 am
Posts: 92Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2004 8:29 pm
We ran out of time discussing how to understand "lead us not into temptation".
Deacon Bob pointed out later that evening by email that the Catechism has a few things to add to that discussion:

2846 This petition goes to the root of the preceding one, for our sins result from our consenting to temptation; we therefore ask our Father not to "lead" us into temptation. It is difficult to translate the Greek verb used by a single English word: the Greek means both "do not allow us to enter into temptation" and "do not let us yield to temptation." "God cannot be tempted by evil and he himself tempts no one"; on the contrary, he wants to set us free from evil. We ask him not to allow us to take the way that leads to sin. We are engaged in the battle "between flesh and spirit"; this petition implores the Spirit of discernment and strength.

2847 The Holy Spirit makes us discern between trials, which are necessary for the growth of the inner man,and temptation, which leads to sin and death. We must also discern between being tempted and consenting to temptation. Finally, discernment unmasks the lie of temptation, whose object appears to be good, a "delight to the eyes" and desirable, when in reality its fruit is death.

God does not want to impose the good, but wants free beings. . . . There is a certain usefulness to temptation. No one but God knows what our soul has received from him, not even we ourselves. But temptation reveals it in order to teach us to know ourselves, and in this way we discover our evil inclinations and are obliged to give thanks for the goods that temptation has revealed to us.

2848 "Lead us not into temptation" implies a decision of the heart: "For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. . . . No one can serve two masters." "If we live by the Spirit, let us also walk by the Spirit." In this assent to the Holy Spirit the Father gives us strength. "No testing has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your strength, but with the temptation will also provide the way of escape, so that you may be able to endure it."

2849 Such a battle and such a victory become possible only through prayer. It is by his prayer that Jesus vanquishes the tempter, both at the outset of his public mission and in the ultimate struggle of his agony. In this petition to our heavenly Father, Christ unites us to his battle and his agony. He urges us to vigilance of the heart in communion with his own. Vigilance is "custody of the heart," and Jesus prayed for us to the Father: "Keep them in your name." The Holy Spirit constantly seeks to awaken us to keep watch. Finally, this petition takes on all its dramatic meaning in relation to the last temptation of our earthly battle; it asks for final perseverance. "Lo, I am coming like a thief! Blessed is he who is awake."

VII "BUT DELIVER US FROM EVIL"

2850 The last petition to our Father is also included in Jesus' prayer: "I am not asking you to take them out of the world, but I ask you to protect them from the evil one." It touches each of us personally, but it is always "we" who pray, in communion with the whole Church, for the deliverance of the whole human family. The Lord's Prayer continually opens us to the range of God's economy of salvation. Our interdependence in the drama of sin and death is turned into solidarity in the Body of Christ, the "communion of saints."

2851 In this petition, evil is not an abstraction, but refers to a person, Satan, the Evil One, the angel who opposes God. The devil (dia-bolos) is the one who "throws himself across" God's plan and his work of salvation accomplished in Christ.

2852 "A murderer from the beginning, . . . a liar and the father of lies," Satan is "the deceiver of the whole world." Through him sin and death entered the world and by his definitive defeat all creation will be "freed from the corruption of sin and death." Now "we know that anyone born of God does not sin, but He who was born of God keeps him, and the evil one does not touch him. We know that we are of God, and the whole world is in the power of the evil one."

The Lord who has taken away your sin and pardoned your faults also protects you and keeps you from the wiles of your adversary the devil, so that the enemy, who is accustomed to leading into sin, may not surprise you. One who entrusts himself to God does not dread the devil. "If God is for us, who is against us?"

2853 Victory over the "prince of this world" was won once for all at the Hour when Jesus freely gave himself up to death to give us his life. This is the judgment of this world, and the prince of this world is "cast out." "He pursued the woman" but had no hold on her: the new Eve, "full of grace" of the Holy Spirit, is preserved from sin and the corruption of death (the Immaculate Conception and the Assumption of the Most Holy Mother of God, Mary, ever virgin). "Then the dragon was angry with the woman, and went off to make war on the rest of her offspring." Therefore the Spirit and the Church pray: "Come, Lord Jesus," since his coming will deliver us from the Evil One.

2854 When we ask to be delivered from the Evil One, we pray as well to be freed from all evils, present, past, and future, of which he is the author or instigator. In this final petition, the Church brings before the Father all the distress of the world. Along with deliverance from the evils that overwhelm humanity, she implores the precious gift of peace and the grace of perseverance in expectation of Christ's return By praying in this way, she anticipates in humility of faith the gathering together of everyone and everything in him who has "the keys of Death and Hades," who "is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty."


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